James Hopkirk
With the Ba’Aka, a few miles south of Bayanga, Dzanga Sangha. The nets you can see here are used for hunting. Women take part in the hunt alongside the men.

With the Ba’Aka, a few miles south of Bayanga, Dzanga Sangha. The nets you can see here are used for hunting. Women take part in the hunt alongside the men.

One of the Ba’Aka women fixing the nets during the hunt. 
The principle of net hunting is that instead of hunting silently, the Ba’Aka make a huge racket in the jungle - singing and shouting. Because there are so many of them, spread out, the animals hide and wait, trying to work out where to run to. The pygmies then lay their nets and beat the bush until the animals run into the nets. The outcome was brutal.

One of the Ba’Aka women fixing the nets during the hunt. 

The principle of net hunting is that instead of hunting silently, the Ba’Aka make a huge racket in the jungle - singing and shouting. Because there are so many of them, spread out, the animals hide and wait, trying to work out where to run to. The pygmies then lay their nets and beat the bush until the animals run into the nets. The outcome was brutal.

The unfortunate blue duiker.

The unfortunate blue duiker.

Dinner of duiker and manioc in the Ba’Aka village, south of Bayanga in the Central African Republic.

Dinner of duiker and manioc in the Ba’Aka village, south of Bayanga in the Central African Republic.